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BLAME GAME: Samuel Muigai is not amused at the treatment he has been given by Kenya Power after paying his electricity bill. On September 12, he reports, he paid his bill (account No. 40032971 through a Family Bank agent, transaction SZ76J3QSRUBJ) at 10:11am. A week later, he checked online, and his account was shown to be in arrears, prompting him visit to the bank’s Kenyatta Avenue branch in Nairobi, who confirmed that the transaction was successful, saying Kenya Power should update its system. But the utility chose to disconnect supply. “Now, who is sleeping on the job?” His contact is [email protected]

SLOPPY WORK: The contractor expanding the Changamwe-Mikindani-Jomvu road in Mombasa Town into a dual carriageway is too sluggish, notes Gerald Mutua Mutiso, adding: “How can eight kilometres take a year?” Over a year since the construction began, Gerald adds, pretty little has been done. He wishes the Kenya National Highways Authority could cancel the contract and give the job to one of the Chinese companies. To rub salt into the wound, he moans, the diversion by the contractor is in a deplorable state, “as it’s too dusty and is wrecking our motor vehicles”. His contact is [email protected]

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CEASEFIRE: Calling for an end to the ethnic clashes in the Rift Valley involving the Maasai, Kipsigis and Ogiek, which have claimed several lives, is Dennis Onyino. Says he: “Homes have been razed and children are not attending school.” He is particularly alarmed that bands of villagers have been roaming with bows and arrows, with the security personnel not moving decisively to stop the criminals. He wants all the crooks carrying the crude weapons used to kill and maim others immediately arrested and charged. His contact is [email protected]

POOR KISWAHILI: The “sweetest news” university don X.N. Iraki says he had heard from South Africa recently is the report that they will start teaching Kiswahili in schools from 2020. A common language for Africa, Iraki adds, would “really unite us just like English or Mandarin”. His concern, though, is that Kiswahili does not get the support it really deserves in Kenya, particularly among the middle and upper classes. “I will not be surprised if soon it becomes an elective in high schools!” His contact is [email protected]

Have a fascinating day, won’t you!



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