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Kenya ladies team wins big in Batumi

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Kenya ladies team comprising of WFM Joyce Nyaruai Ndirangu, Lucy Wanjiru, Daphne Mwikali and Sasha Mongeli beat stiff competition to defeat Senegal 4-0 during the 4th round of 2018 World Chess Olympiad.

Woman Fide Master Joyce Ndirangu was up on material and winning easily over Senegal Bobrova Leonidovna. Bobrova made a white 16th H3 move that began to give Joyce an advantage. The Senegalese made Bxd6 move that saw her loose to the Kenyan.

Lucy Wanjiru who is making her debut at the global competition is upbeat of great performances after her victory on Thursday over Senegalese.

“My preparation for this game began immediately after the pairings were displayed online. By 1am in the morning, I had figured out what to play and psyched myself up for the game. The second part of the preparation involved a gym session after waking up and an energy boost diet”, said Lucy.

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She started off the game a signature move, e4. Black’s response was clearly chess theory that she was already familiar with. The game was very easy to win her opponent made a blunder on the seventh move.

“After her blunder, I pulled off a series of forced moves that landed white into trouble and within seven more moves, I won the game by checkmate. “said a delighted Wanjiru.

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Sasha Mongeli defeated Senegalese Dianhka Fatou after her opponent played Nxe4.  Sasha responded with a Qe2 move to pin the knight. This led to Fatou playing Be7which was a blunder since it left the knight hanging, Sasha captured the knight then Fatou castled.

The Kenyan then played Bd3 threatening mate in one. The pressure of the game saw the Senegalese respond with f6.

The next three moves that included Qf5 check mate saw Sasha emerge victorious during the

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Kenya needs a new tax policy that will drive the economy forward

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Hundreds of Locals await services at the Kenya Revenue Authority.[Maarufu Mohamed, Standard]

While Kenya’s history is replete with economic blueprints ranging from Vision 2030 to the Big Four Agenda, there has not been clear articulation of the principles guiding the collection of revenue to fund the country’s growth plans.
And as Kenyans find themselves facing a mountain of debt and its attendant high taxation policies that touch on everything from bread to infant milk, the anger is palpable.
Now more than ever, there is a great need to have a new tax policy that outlines the principles that will guide the Kenyan economy into prosperity.
Ideas around taxation principles have been floated by various thinkers over the last few centuries. Adam Smith wrote in the Wealth of Nations that “…the economic incomes of private people are of three main types: rent, wages and profit. Ordinary taxpayers will ultimately pay their taxes from at least one of these revenue sources.”
In his mind, Smith must have classified the entire economy into the three factors of production of land, labour and enterprise. His ideas have been enriched over time and today we also include the fourth factor of production which is capital – whose income is in the form of interest.
In many ways, these four factors of production might be compared to the four legs of a table that give it stability and balance. They are the four building blocks of the economy – emphasising one at the expense of others creates an imbalance and generates instability across the entire system.
Of all the four factors of production, it is the entrepreneur who has borne the brunt of over taxation.  From the introduction of the digital service tax targeting online businesses to the increase in VAT on fuel products, and now with the controversial minimum tax laws, the catalogue of obstacles facing the business community is alarming.
All this while, the Covid pandemic is ravaging the economy, leaving many jobless and contributing to a very restless environment. Whereas many might hope that the full reopening of the economy will help mitigate this harsh environment, there is a wave of discontentment across the country that calls for a fundamental transformation of our economic model into one that values and promotes enterprise and innovation.

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In sharp contrast, the factor of production associated with capital appears to have been spared from the harsh taxation regime evident in the other areas. The Treasury proposal to remove the excise tax of 20 per cent on bank loans will lessen the tax load in the banking sector by up to Sh7 billion annually. There was a promise that this could see banks reducing loan costs, but these claims have been impeached by evidence on the ground pointing to the contrary.
Such examples reinforce a narrative that Kenya’s economic model is anchored on punishing enterprise but rewarding capital.
In the final analysis, a sense of balance and stability can only be achieved through a new tax policy that equally draws from all the factors of production.  Through a spirit of shared responsibility, Kenya can be able to raise enough tax revenue without one party feeling overburdened.
The writer is Chief Economist at Mentoria Economics

 

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Cheers, flak as split over BBI widens

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High Court verdict on the Building Bridges Initiative (BBI) petitions continues to elicit mixed reactions from political players.
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Milano Marathon:Titus Ekiru defends title in fifth fastest time – KBC

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Titus Ekiru retained his Milano Marathon title in style by registering the fifth fastest time 2:2.57 to win the men’s race held Sunday in Italy

 

Kenya’s Titus Ekiru retained his Milano Marathon title in style by registering the fifth fastest time  2:2.57 to win the men’s race held Sunday in Italy.

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Ekiru steered clear after the 30km mark and held on to clinch the race ahead of compatriot  Reuben Kiprop who was placed second in 2:3.55, while Barnabas Kiptum wound up third after posting 2:4.17.

 

 

“I have realized that running 2:1 is possible especially after regaining my shape and my body is in great condition so I will discuss with my coach on how I can better the time’’, said Ekiru.

Ekiru  who trains in Kapsabet  Nandi County is under the management of Italian Rosa Associati .

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Kenya’s Racheal Jemutai  finished second in the women’s race ,posting 2:22.50 behind race winner Ethiopian Hiwot Gebrekidan  who cut the tape first in 2:19.35,Bahrain’s Eunice  Chebichi  wound up third.

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