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Don’t politicise BBI, Uhuru urges leaders

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DENNIS LUBANGA

By DENNIS LUBANGA
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President Uhuru Kenyatta has criticised a section politicians for rejecting the Building Bridges Initiative (BBI) report before seeing its contents. He said there is need to appreciate divergent views.  

“There is no need for insults when it comes to this (BBI) report. Some people have rejected the BBI report yet they don’t know it’s contents,” said the President on Friday. 

“Let us take time to go through this report and come out with good things that can make our country even better and more united,” he said.

The Head of State, who met chairman of the BBI Taskforce Garissa Senator Yusuf Haji on Friday, said he will receive the report on Tuesday.  

“They are free to bring it (BBI report) to me on Tuesday and I assure you that as soon as I receive it, I will personally go through it and hand it to Kenyans,” said President Kenyatta.

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He urged leaders across the political divide to stop politicising the issue.

“I urge politicians to read the BBI report and engage in meaningful discourse, we don’t want to divide this country,” he said.

He added: ” Let us address these issues in a sober way, as adults, as civilised human beings.”

President Kenyatta spoke when he presided over the fourth Kibabii University graduation in Bungoma County.

He was accompanied by area Governor Wycliffe Wangamati, Senator Moses Wetang’ula, Senate Speaker Ken Lusaka and Education Cabinet Secretary Prof George Magoha.

The President urged all stakeholders to be committed to the development of young people as the country rolls out the Competence-Based Curriculum.

“I ask our universities and other institutions of higher learning as well as middle level colleges to take the lead in transforming our young people. The government will continue to offer an enabling environment and at the same time continue to support the infrastructural growth and academic staff development in our educational institutions to ensure our young people succeed in life,” explained the Head of State.

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President Kenyatta who doubles as the Chancellor of Kibabii University urged all universities to double their investments in research and innovation to enable them provide practical solutions to the country’s challenges.  

“The demand of higher learning in Kenya has rapidly increased over the last few decades and to meet these demands my administration has increased investment in these institutions with the aim of fostering growth of the economy,” he said.

The Head of State, who also launched a multimillion hostel at the university, called for reforms in the entire education system including universities.

“We must come up with a robust education curriculum that is designed to equip and enable the learners to develop and own intellectual capacity relevant to the world today. This is why we have embarked on broad sector reforms meant at to streamline the operations of the local universities,” he said.

He urged all universities to collaborate with the ministry of education in undertaking reforms aimed at producing high quality graduates.  

“To comply with the higher standards of training that have been set up by the ministry through the Commission of Higher Education, universities must get rid of the rampant duplication of degree programmes, professionalise their financial management structures and incorporate good governance principles in their operations,” President Kenyatta said.

Over 1,500 graduated with various degrees, diplomas and certificates.

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More East African artistes seeking to join politics – Nairobi News

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Perhaps inspired by Charles Njagua ‘Jaguar’ and Robert Kyagulanyi aka Bobi Wine, a number of musicians in Tanzania and Uganda have lately declared their interest to run for elective seats ahead of general elections which will be held in 2020 and 2021 respectively in the two countries.

Kenya’s Jaguar clinched the Starehe parliamentary seat during the 2017 general elections while Bobi Wine triumphed in Kyadondo by-elections in the same year.

Bobi Wine is now eyeing the country’s presidency and has since emerged as one of President Yoweri Museveni’s main opponents.

But who are these artiste who are now seeking to join them?

1. Jackson Mayanja aka Jose Chameleone

The Ugandan musician has already presented his nomination papers and is seeking to become the next Lord Mayor of Kampala. He will be running on a People Power movement ticket, which is associated with Bobi Wine.

2. Khamis Mwinjuma aka Mwana FA

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During a recent interview with Clouds FM, Mwana FA announced he will be vying for the Tanga Parliamentary seat. His political campaign has however been toned down after he announced he had contracted the coronavirus in April. He has kept a low profile since being discharged from the hospital.

3. Hamisi Shaban Taletale aka Babu Tale

The Tanzanian music manager and co-founder of WCB Wasafi music label made famous by Diamond Platnumz has also joined politics. He is gunning for the Morogoro parliamentary seat.

4. Jackson Ngechu aka Prezzo

The Kenyan musician has on several occasions announced he will be contesting for the Kibra Parliamentary seat in the 2022 general elections.

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Woman dies after being electrocuted by a refrigerator: The Standard

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A woman has died in Nyando after she was electrocuted by a refrigerator.
While confirming the incident, Nyando OCPD Leonard Matete said Maureen Atieno (pictured) got electrocuted while opening the fridge at her home in Kakola, Nyando Sub-County.
According to the police boss, the matter was reported by Atieno’s father-in-law who told them that she was going to pick some fish which she wanted to fry and take to the market.
Matete stated that upon proceeding to the refrigerator, a touch on its door electrocuted her instantly. He said Atieno began wailing before she fell on the ground.
The police boss stated that Atieno died while being rushed to Boya Hospital and has since been transferred to Ahero Sub-County hospital’s morgue.
While terming the incident as unusual, Matete stated that they had launched investigations on the incident, and had called Kenya Power to help with the probe.
“We are investigating the matter, we have called in Kenya Power to check on what might have gone wrong,” he stated.
Her death comes barely six months after her late husband, William Omondi Alias Sisqo, who was among the famous Nyando six died in November last year in a gruesome murder in Busia.

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The Guardian view on Covid-19 worldwide: on the march | Opinion

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“Most of the world sort of sat by and watched with almost a sense of detachment and bemusement,” said Helen Clark, appointed to investigate the World Health Organization’s handling of the pandemic. The former New Zealand prime minister was describing the early weeks of the outbreak, and the sense that coronavirus was a problem “over there”. The failure to recognise our interconnection created complacency even as the death toll rose.

It took three months for the first million people to fall sick – but only a week to record the last million of the nearly 13 million cases now reported worldwide. As England emerges from lockdown at an unwary pace, Covid-19 is accelerating globally. The WHO has reported a record surge of a quarter of a million cases in a single day. The death toll is over half a million people and rising fast.

Idlib, Syria’s last rebel-held province, has reported its first case: a frightening portent, given the desperate circumstances in which people are already living. On Thursday, the head of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention said new cases were up 24% on the continent in the previous week, with cases surging in South Africa, Kenya and other countries. India, now the world’s third worst-affected country, reported a record rise of 27,000 cases on Saturday, to over 800,000 – almost certainly far below the true level.

Australia and Spain have reimposed local lockdowns, and Hong Kong has shut schools again. But the economic, social and political costs of such measures are all the higher second time around. In Serbia, plans for a strict curfew were downgraded after sparking anti-government protests. Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, has said it cannot afford to shut down again despite rising deaths.

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So no one can afford to be complacent; the UK’s pandemic response should not be starting to “wind down”, as a No 10 insider reportedly said. Nor are endless lockdowns either desirable or sustainable. But we should not conclude that the worst is inescapable – rather, that effective measures, including the use of masks, distancing, and testing and tracing, are possible and make a vast difference to outcomes.

Vietnam has recorded no deaths and fewer than 400 cases, while the US has seen 3 million cases and more than 130,000 deaths, thanks not only to Donald Trump’s utter failure to prepare his country for coronavirus, but his reckless subsequent determination to push states into premature reopening. Infections are now surging in 41 states. On Friday, Florida recorded 11,433 new cases and saw its highest single day death rate, of 188.

In South America, Brazil’s president, Jair Bolsonaro, has repeatedly trivialised the pandemic and defied guidelines even since becoming infected himself. His country has 1.8m cases. Peru, Chile and Mexico are also badly hit. But Uruguay and Paraguay, which border Brazil, have had fewer than 50 deaths between them.

Though in some countries the apparently low impact of coronavirus will reflect low levels of testing, the US shows that prosperity is far from the only determinant of success. Nonetheless, the difficulties of fighting the pandemic in overcrowded places with malnourished populations lacking basic sanitation or basic healthcare are obvious. Poorer nations will need support to deal with both the pandemic and its broader impact. Hunger and poverty are surging and could kill more people than Covid-19.

Leadership can’t come from the US, as it withdraws from the WHO and attempts to corner supplies. Finding agreement even within the European Union is proving hard. But coronavirus has shown us that “over there” cannot be separated from “over here”. For everyone’s sake, we must recognise and honour our ties.

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